41 Comments

Get Focus with Margie Deeb

May 27, 2014, 05:27 am  Posted by Lark
 

The soon-to-be-released book The Beader’s Guide to Jewelry Design, written by Margie Deeb, teaches you to design your own creations by paying attention to unity, scale, proportion, balance, rhythm, shape, pattern, texture, movement, drape, and color. You’ll explore the interaction of jewelry and the body: how it moves, how it drapes, how it guides the viewer’s eye to complement–or clash–with different body sizes and wardrobe. The concepts presented are supported by photos, illustrations, before-and-after examples, and challenges. Tips from today’s leading jewelry designers in polymer clay, beads, precious metal clay, ceramic, and wire teach you how to take your ideas and refine them into extraordinary, wearable jewelry.

  • Discover why a piece of jewelry is visually appealing.
  • Understand why you prefer certain styles and how to apply the concepts to achieve what you want.
  • Gain confidence in using specific applications of visual and aesthetic principles.
  • Be inspired to grow and express more of yourself and your unique visions of beauty.

 

This the third in a nine-part interview with Margie Deeb. This one is about Focal Point & Emphasis.

Q What do you mean by “focal point” and “emphasis”?

A Our task as designers is to guide viewers into the world of our jewelry. You do this as other artists in all mediums do, with carefully planned focal points and areas of emphasis. Our goal is to first attract the eye, then guide it. We consciously design an entry point and a subsequent path for the eye to travel. In the book I show some of the most powerful ways to do this.

 

 

I also discuss different approaches to emphasis: Do you want a main focal point, or an allover pattern? Do you want a centered or an off-center focal point? What are the benefits of one over the other? How can you use negative space as an attractor or focal point? And the most alluring and elusive part of this chapter—how to imbue your work with mystery.

 

 

Q That sounds very intriguing! Tell me more about mystery in jewelry.

A Look at a piece of jewelry that stops you in your tracks, one you can’t stop thinking about or one you wish you had created. Can you feel yourself drawn in, seduced as if by a magical spell? That is the power of mystery. I feel this when I look at much of Heidi Kummli’s work. The mystery she creates is both within and beyond the intricacies and drama of her work.

You can feel the presence of mystery. You sense a sacredness. You gaze at a piece of jewelry and your mind leaps. You feel awe. You feel wonder. You want to figure out why you’re so drawn to it, and you’re inspired to make something as exciting or beautiful. In the presence of mystery, you feel more alive and empowered as an artist.

 


 ***

Check in next Tuesday for the fourth part of this interview with Margie.

Margie Deeb is the author of four other books. For more info about her new one, check out http://beadersguidetojewelrydesign.com

Margie Deeb


 

 
 
 
 
38 Comments

Margie Deeb Discusses Unity

May 20, 2014, 05:18 am  Posted by Lark
 

The soon-to-be-released book The Beader’s Guide to Jewelry Design, written by Margie Deeb, teaches you to design your own creations by paying attention to unity, scale, proportion, balance, rhythm, shape, pattern, texture, movement, drape, and color. You’ll explore the interaction of jewelry and the body: how it moves, how it drapes, how it guides the viewer’s eye to complement–or clash–with different body sizes and wardrobe. The concepts presented are supported by photos, illustrations, before-and-after examples, and challenges. Tips from today’s leading jewelry designers in polymer clay, beads, precious metal clay, ceramic, and wire teach you how to take your ideas and refine them into extraordinary, wearable jewelry.

  • Discover why a piece of jewelry is visually appealing.
  • Understand why you prefer certain styles and how to apply the concepts to achieve what you want.
  • Gain confidence in using specific applications of visual and aesthetic principles.
  • Be inspired to grow and express more of yourself and your unique visions of beauty.

 

This is the second in a nine-part interview (we’re keeping it bite-size!) with the author.

Q Your book contains six chapters on the major principles of design—unity, focal point and emphasis, balance, movement, shape, color. That’s a lot of information! For someone new to design, do you suggest starting at the beginning of the book, or is there one section readers might focus on first? In other words, do you feel there’s one principle that’s more important than any of the others to explore first?

A I wrote the chapters in an order that was easiest and most natural for clear understanding. I suggest starting at the beginning for anyone, not only those new to design. Seasoned artists often rely on the same set of visual design principles as they work. This book presents many design principles they may not have explored, which will spark ideas and inspire them to try new approaches. Design, like color, isn’t something you learn once and get it forever. I’ve studied design and color for over 45 years, and will continue to for the rest of my life.

The book's table of contents

 

 Q Let’s talk about the principles of design. For someone not familiar with these concepts, can you summarize in a sentence or two what a designer is trying to achieve through unity?

A Good design expresses harmony, in which every part affirms its connection with all the rest, each element speaking to and with the others. Color, placement, texture, pattern, technique, materials, and components belong together: They’re related to each other and to the whole. There’s an intentional order and purpose to the piece. We call this kind of harmony unity. Without unity, a piece becomes chaotic and unappealing.

Unity is the goal of good design: how much unity is the challenge. It’s often difficult to know “when to say when” regarding how much variety to include within a piece of jewelry. On the other hand, playing it safe too often can lead to boring overuse of similarity. The challenge is how to balance variety and repetition in order to create striking unity.

It helps to think of unity not as a destination, but as a state existing somewhere between random variety and repetitious uniformity.

Q The chapter called Unity contains a section about The Ugly Necklace Contest. As your editor, the first time I saw it, I got a huge kick out of it! I had never heard of that competition. Tell this blog’s readers a little about it.

Warren S. Feld, owner of the Land of Odds bead store, concocted and sponsors the annual The Ugly Necklace Contest. It’s a brilliant idea! I’m so grateful he let me include what he has learned and some of the photos from the contest, for there is much to be learned from jewelry born of the attempt to make and to interpret “ugly.” As I say in the book, “Mediocre is easy to achieve. We all can do it when we feel lazy, uninspired, or we’re not challenging ourselves. Mediocre falls in the middle of the spectrum between beautiful and ugly. Both beauty and ugliness encompass what this book is about: the deliberate application—or lack of application—of design theories.”

Click on this image to link to a PDF that gives you a sneak peek at The Ugly Necklace Contest!


 ***

Check in next Tuesday for the next part of my interview with Margie!

Margie Deeb is the author of four other books. For more info about The Beader’s Guide to Jewelry Design, check out http://beadersguidetojewelrydesign.com

Margie Deeb


 
 
 
 
46 Comments

New Book from Margie Deeb!

May 13, 2014, 06:30 am  Posted by Lark
 

The soon-to-be-released book The Beader’s Guide to Jewelry Design, written by Margie Deeb, teaches you to design your own creations by paying attention to unity, scale, proportion, balance, rhythm, shape, pattern, texture, movement, drape, and color. You’ll explore the interaction of jewelry and the body: how it moves, how it drapes, how it guides the viewer’s eye to complement–or clash–with different body sizes and wardrobe. The concepts presented are supported by photos, illustrations, before-and-after examples, and challenges. Tips from today’s leading jewelry designers in polymer clay, beads, precious metal clay, ceramic, and wire teach you how to take your ideas and refine them into extraordinary, wearable jewelry.

  • Discover why a piece of jewelry is visually appealing.
  • Understand why you prefer certain styles and how to apply the concepts to achieve what you want.
  • Gain confidence in using specific applications of visual and aesthetic principles.
  • Be inspired to grow and express more of yourself and your unique visions of beauty.

Margie Deeb

 

This is the first in a nine-part interview (we’re keeping it bite-size!) with the author.

Q What made you decide to write this book?

A As with all my books, I’ve written a book that I want to read. There’s been nothing published that focuses deeply on aesthetic principles of design for jewelry artists. This book is my answer to that lack. And like my other books, it makes exploring abstract concepts quite fun. It’s a thrilling read for anyone interested in design, not just jewelry design.

Q Is there any one thing you hope readers take away from reading the book?

A Yes, and it’s a two-part hope: inspiration and beauty. I want the reader to be inspired to design their unique versions of beauty.

I see bead artists afraid to take risks, afraid to design jewelry. I see them giving up after a couple of tries because they think they don’t have the capacity to design. I want them to catch the fire of inspiration.

I see a lot of beaded jewelry that pays little to no attention to aesthetics, and I’m hoping to inspire designers to focus on overall beauty, not just “wow” and bling factors, or technical expertise.

Q You used social media to augment the book. Will you say a little about that?

A I asked questions of readers of my newsletter and on Facebook. In this way I learned what beaders need in terms of jewelry design. Throughout the pages you’ll see the names and concerns of those who responded. It was a fun process, and I’m grateful for their input and everything I learned from them.

Q You both wrote the book and served as the designer and illustrator. You also shot much of the photography. What a huge undertaking! What was your favorite part of putting together this book?

A I’m a professional artist/designer as well as a writer, so handling all aspects was a joy. I loved every bit of it. If I had to choose one part over all, it would be drawing the illustrations. I wish I could include more illustrations.

The table of contents. Click on this image to link to a PDF that gives you a sneak peek of the first few pages of the book!

Q The book contains almost 200 photos of jewelry made by some 70 artists. How did you choose them?

A I searched online and in books for jewelry that clearly illuminates concepts I explore in the text.  I also commissioned pieces from artists, giving them guidelines for the concept I was presenting. Almost all of the “Challenge Yourself” sections involved commissions.

 

Click here for a sneak peek at the first few pages of the book, and check in next Tuesday for the second part of my interview with Margie!

 ***

Margie Deeb is the author of four other books. For more info about her new one, check out http://beadersguidetojewelrydesign.com