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Margie Deeb Talks About Jewelry & the Body

June 24, 2014, 05:33 am  Posted by Lark
 

The Beader’s Guide to Jewelry Design, written by Margie Deeb, teaches you to design your own creations by paying attention to unity, scale, proportion, balance, rhythm, shape, pattern, texture, movement, drape, and color. You’ll explore the interaction of jewelry and the body: how it moves, how it drapes, how it guides the viewer’s eye to complement–or clash–with different body sizes and wardrobe. The concepts presented are supported by photos, illustrations, before-and-after examples, and challenges. Tips from today’s leading jewelry designers in polymer clay, beads, precious metal clay, ceramic, and wire teach you how to take your ideas and refine them into extraordinary, wearable jewelry.

  • Discover why a piece of jewelry is visually appealing.
  • Understand why you prefer certain styles and how to apply the concepts to achieve what you want.
  • Gain confidence in using specific applications of visual and aesthetic principles.
  • Be inspired to grow and express more of yourself and your unique visions of beauty.

 

This is the seventh in a nine-part interview with the author.

Q The chapters about the major principles of design are followed by Chapter 7: Jewelry and The Body. Tell me about this section, Margie.

A This is my favorite chapter in the book! It’s so very important to consider how jewelry interacts with the body, not just how it looks in a photo or on a display form. Too often that’s all we see because we’re looking at static photos. And unfortunately, many bead artists disregard the wearer’s size, coloring, skin tone, shape, and comfort when making jewelry. This chapter presents information that has never been published, material I’ve spent decades learning and gathering. Chapter 7 is worth the price of the entire book, in my opinion. It includes info on how to design necklaces for specific fashion necklines, body shapes and sizes, face structure, and more.

 

 

 

I’ve developed a “Customer Preference Form” to copy and fill out when you’re designing for specific clients. You can use it to capture all you need to know about your customer, including measurements, allergies, color preferences, and more.

 


 Q Does the success of jewelry on the body have to do with proportion?

A In large part, yes. When a woman is overwhelmed by jewelry, it often looks comical. When a woman wears jewelry that can barely be seen, it can look odd and unflattering. The proportions within the piece jewelry are so important, too. A huge focal bead on a flimsy strand (something I see far too often) appears painfully out of proportion. We cover those kind of proportions in the Balance chapter.

 

Click on this image to link to a PDF of these pages

 

Check in next Tuesday for the eighth part of this interview with Margie!

 ***

Margie Deeb is the author of four other beading books. For more info about her newest one, check out http://beadersguidetojewelrydesign.com


 
 
 
 
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World Wide Knit in Public Day

June 19, 2014, 14:00 pm  Posted by Connie Santisteban
 

World Wide Knit in Public Day, or WWKiP Day, takes place from June 14th through June 22nd this year and knitters around the world continue to keep this 9-year-old tradition strong.

Members of the Ravelry group, “Madelinetosh Shop Stalkers,” gather to knit in downtown Portland, ME.

WWKiP is the largest knitter run event in the world and is meant to demonstrate that knitting can be a community activity. It’s an event that brings crafters together to celebrate all of the fiber arts.

Need some ideas of what to knit or crochet in public this year? Portable projects are a popular option and we have some free projects to help you celebrate.

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Wondering what to do with your single skeins of super bulky yarn? Try “Skinny Scalloped Scarf” from Crochet Love by Jenny Doh:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Need a quick on-the-go project? Check out “Sunburst Beret” from Crochet Boutique by Rachael Oglesby:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saving that hand-dyed skein of fingering weight yarn for a special project? Look no further than “Cintaya Long Cowl” from Sock Yarn Studio by Carol Sulcoski:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How are you planning to celebrate? Tell us what you knit or crochet in public in the comments and share the WWKiP Day love!

 
 
 
 
38 Comments

Shape & Color, with Margie Deeb

June 17, 2014, 05:31 am  Posted by Lark
 

The Beader’s Guide to Jewelry Design, written by Margie Deeb, teaches you to design your own creations by paying attention to unity, scale, proportion, balance, rhythm, shape, pattern, texture, movement, drape, and color. You’ll explore the interaction of jewelry and the body: how it moves, how it drapes, how it guides the viewer’s eye to complement–or clash–with different body sizes and wardrobe. The concepts presented are supported by photos, illustrations, before-and-after examples, and challenges. Tips from today’s leading jewelry designers in polymer clay, beads, precious metal clay, ceramic, and wire teach you how to take your ideas and refine them into extraordinary, wearable jewelry.

  • Discover why a piece of jewelry is visually appealing.
  • Understand why you prefer certain styles and how to apply the concepts to achieve what you want.
  • Gain confidence in using specific applications of visual and aesthetic principles.
  • Be inspired to grow and express more of yourself and your unique visions of beauty.

 

Margie Deeb

This is the sixth in a nine-part interview with Margie.                   

Q How is shape important, Margie?

A As we wear a carefully crafted shape of beauty—for that is exactly what jewelry is—it becomes an expression and extension of who we are. Shape contributes to that expression. When you look at a piece of jewelry from a distance, its shape is the first thing you see. You can’t discern individual beads or intricate surface embellishment. Your eye immediately perceives just the essential shape.

Obsessed as bead artists are with surface embellishment, it can be tempting to minimize the importance of the shape of the jewelry we’re designing so we can get to the “good stuff,” the intricacies of stitch wizardry and surface ornamentation. When this kind of myopia is in place, design suffers. The most extraordinary beads woven into fascinating patterns amount to little if they’re part of a sloppy or confusing shape.

So I encourage everyone to fall in love with shapes: learn all you can about their movement, style, and language. Your jewelry will be more beautiful because of it.

Click on this image to link to a PDF of these pages

 

 

Q It seems color would be the most important principle for a piece of jewelry. Isn’t that the first thing people notice?                           

A Most often, yes. But it depends on the distance the jewelry is being seen from. When seen up close, color does compose the major impact of a piece. When looking at a piece of beadwork, a viewer will accept or reject it in less than 30 seconds. The colors account for 60 percent of that decision. Consider the jewelry on magazine covers: color provides the over-riding emotional tone. But when seen from a bit of a distance, even just another foot or two, it’s the shape of the jewelry that our eye immediately discerns. That’s why a whole chapter of my book is devoted to shape.

I devote another chapter to color. Our reaction to color is emotional and visceral. Our “heart” reacts strongly and we feel the response in our bodies. Likewise, the colors we choose for our jewelry elicit emotional, gut-level responses from others. Color, and color alone, can infuse your creations with the ability to astonish.

Color is critical to the artist because it’s one of the most powerful notes in your artistic voice. Your unique sense of color, cultivated and nurtured, becomes a signature of who you are.

 

 

 

Check in next Tuesday for the seventh part of my interview with Margie!

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Margie Deeb is the author of five beading books. For more info about her newest one, check out http://beadersguidetojewelrydesign.com


 
 
 
 
42 Comments

You Move Me, Margie Deeb

June 10, 2014, 05:30 am  Posted by Lark
 

The Beader’s Guide to Jewelry Design, written by Margie Deeb, teaches you to design your own creations by paying attention to unity, scale, proportion, balance, rhythm, shape, pattern, texture, movement, drape, and color. You’ll explore the interaction of jewelry and the body: how it moves, how it drapes, how it guides the viewer’s eye to complement–or clash–with different body sizes and wardrobe. The concepts presented are supported by photos, illustrations, before-and-after examples, and challenges. Tips from today’s leading jewelry designers in polymer clay, beads, precious metal clay, ceramic, and wire teach you how to take your ideas and refine them into extraordinary, wearable jewelry.

  • Discover why a piece of jewelry is visually appealing.
  • Understand why you prefer certain styles and how to apply the concepts to achieve what you want.
  • Gain confidence in using specific applications of visual and aesthetic principles.
  • Be inspired to grow and express more of yourself and your unique visions of beauty.

 

This is the fifth in a nine-part interview with Margie Deeb.                          

Q Why did you include a chapter on movement?

A Movement is something I’ve never seen written about, even though it’s critical to beautiful jewelry: Movement makes art come alive. We know physical movement well, the kind that occurs when beaded fringe sways or metal charms shimmy. Physical movement is obvious. There is, however, another kind of movement—one less tangible, one that doesn’t physically move. We sense this intangible movement more often than we see it.

 

Click on the image above to link to a PDF of these pages

 

It is the movement—physical or intangible—in jewelry that initially calls to and captures the viewer: the sparkle of a reflective facet, the sinuous curve of an element, the beat-like percussion of a repetitive pattern. In this chapter we examine the movement of light, pattern, line, shape, texture, and color. We dicuss the “musical”  effects of visual rhythm, repetition, and space.

 

 

I love studying intangible movement because it involves intuition and feeling rather than anything physically measurable. I wrote: “Intangible movement and visual rhythm dwell in the realm of feeling and the senses—slightly elusive, slightly mysterious, perfect for evoking mood. You can create tension by repeating angular elements. Smaller elements can create more rapid movement. Imbue a piece with tranquility by using long, curvilinear shapes and motifs in horizontal positions. To speed up movement, increase the repetition with progressively shorter intervals. To slow it down, do the opposite.”

 

Which kind of repeated line makes you feel more calm? Which moves faster? Does one seem older than the other?

 

Visit this blog next Tuesday for the next part of the interview with Margie!

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Margie Deeb is the author of five beading books. For more info about her newest one, check out http://beadersguidetojewelrydesign.com


 
 
 
 
42 Comments

Margie Deeb Stays Balanced

June 03, 2014, 05:29 am  Posted by Lark
 

Today is the official release of The Beader’s Guide to Jewelry Design, by Margie Deeb! Congratulations, Margie!

This information-packed book teaches you to design your own creations by paying attention to unity, scale, proportion, balance, rhythm, shape, pattern, texture, movement, drape, and color. You’ll explore the interaction of jewelry and the body: how it moves, how it drapes, how it guides the viewer’s eye to complement–or clash–with different body sizes and wardrobe. The concepts presented are supported by photos, illustrations, before-and-after examples, and challenges. Tips from today’s leading jewelry designers in polymer clay, beads, precious metal clay, ceramic, and wire teach you how to take your ideas and refine them into extraordinary, wearable jewelry.

  • Discover why a piece of jewelry is visually appealing.
  • Understand why you prefer certain styles and how to apply the concepts to achieve what you want.
  • Gain confidence in using specific applications of visual and aesthetic principles.
  • Be inspired to grow and express more of yourself and your unique visions of beauty.

 

This is the fourth in a nine-part interview with Margie Deeb.
Q Tell us about balance as it applies to jewelry design.
A When something is visually off-balance, we feel it. In my book we explore ways to achieve visual balance (both symmetrical and asymmetrical) because balance takes us a step further in achieving the unity we seek in jewelry design.

 

Click on this image to link to a PDF of these pages

 

In this chapter we explore all kinds of balance: radial, vertical, horizontal, symmetrical. We discuss what kinds of balance harmonize best with the body. We look at why asymmetrical balance can be so compelling. We examine balance of composition and of movement. There are so many ways to play with balance, and we explore achieving it through value, color, positioning of elements, texture, pattern, shape, and movement.

 

 

Q What do you mean by “balance through value or color”?

A Darker colors—those with lower value—are visually heavier than lighter colors. You can use a larger area of a lighter color to counterbalance a small area of dark. Now, balancing dark and light is relatively simple. When you add color into the equation, it becomes more complex. With color we need to consider luminosity—the brilliance of a color. A color’s brightness affects visual weight.

A small amount of a darker or muted (less saturated, more dull) color can counterbalance an expanse of a lighter color. But when luminosity comes into play we need to look more carefully. Bright, luminous colors demand more attention than colors that are simply lighter.

Balance through Value

In the illustration on the left (above), the smallest circle is dark (visually heavy), so it balances all three lighter, larger circles. The positioning of lights and darks balances the composition. In the drawing on the right, the dark circle in the earring balances the whole circle because its visual weight is equal to the crescent and the lightest circle.

 

Check back next Tuesday for the next part of this interview with Margie Deeb.

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Margie Deeb is the author of five beading books. For more info about her newest one, check out http://beadersguidetojewelrydesign.com