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Free Project: Kinterra Cowl by Carol J. Sulcoski

November 10, 2016, 15:32 pm  Posted by Ardi Alspach
 

KinterraCowl copySelf-striping yarn is increasingly popular with crafters, but many knitters lack the knowledge to work with the yarn effectively. Carol Sulcoski’s latest book, Self-Striping Yarn Studio (Order Here >> B&N, Amazon, IndieBound), begins with a comprehensive technical section that explains how to use and manipulate self-striping yarn, something no previous pattern collection has offered. After reading the accessible instructions and tips, knitters will be inspired to cast on one of 24 new and original designs. Get a taste of what this book has to offer with this free pattern, not included in the book!

button2Kinterra Cowl by Carol J. Sulcoski
Skill Level: Easy

FINISHED MEASUREMENTS
Approx 81″/206cm long by 6 1⁄2″/16.5cm wide after blocking

 

MATERIALS AND TOOLS

  • Black Bunny Fibers Stripey Sock (75% superwash merino, 25% nylon; 3 1⁄2 oz/100g = 450yd/411m); 1 skein color perky rainbow (A)—approx 400yd/366m of self-striping fingering weight yarn superfine
  • Kraemer Yarns Rachel (100% superwash merino; 3 1⁄2 oz/100g = 425yd/389m); 1 skein color natural (B)—approx 400yd/366m of solid fingering weight yarn superfine
  • Knitting needles: 3.25mm (size 3 U.S.) needles or size to obtain gauge
  • Tapestry needle

 

GAUGE
Approx 28 sts/32 rows = 4″/10cm in Stockinette stitch, before blocking.
Gauge is not essential for this project.

Note: Carry color not in use along edge to avoid breaking yarn.

 

INSTRUCTIONS
First Section:

With yarn A, CO 50 sts. Purl 1 row.

Row 1: With yarn A, k3, yo, k2tog, k to last 5 sts, k2tog, yo, k3.

Row 2: Purl.

Repeat these 2 rows using yarn A.

Change to yarn B and work these 2 rows twice more.

Repeat these 8 rows until cowl measures 27″/68.5cm and ending with Row 8.

Second Section:

Cont in the same manner, working 6 rows in A and 2 rows in B until cowl measures 54″/137cm.

 Third Section:

Cont in same manner, working 2 rows in A and 2 rows in B until cowl measures 81″/206cm.

BO all sts, leaving long tail for seaming.

 

FINISHING

Weave in all ends except long tail for seaming, and block.

Sew CO edge to BO edge.

Note: If you wish, you can seam the cowl; give the cowl a twist and then seam it for a mobius effect; or leave the cowl unseamed and wear as a scarf—knitter’s choice!

 

Self Striping Yarn StudioABOUT THE AUTHOR

Carol J. Sulcoski is a knitwear designer, writer, hand dyer, and teacher. Her books include Sock Yarn Studio (Lark), Lace Yarn Studio (Lark), Knit So Fine (Interweave), and Knitting Socks with Handpainted Yarns (Interweave). Carol’s work has also appeared in such magazines as Vogue Knitting, KnitSimple, Interweave Knits, KnitScene, and Noro Magazine. Carol’s hand-dyed yarns can be purchased at blackbunnyfibers.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
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Basic Leather Tassel Tutorial

November 02, 2016, 15:03 pm  Posted by Ardi Alspach
 

CreativeLeatherJewelry_ccvrLuxurious leather never goes out of fashion, and now Christina Anton, owner of Boo and Boo Factory in Chicago, shows how to use leather to create bold, unique jewelry with a modern, architectural touch in her new book, Creative Leather Jewelry (Get your copy here: B&N, Amazon, IndieBound). The book has 21 projects, including layered fringe earrings, a dangling chain triangle necklace, and a geometric cuff bracelet, that are perfect for beginners and any crafter looking to spark their creativity!

Below, Christina has kindly provided our readers with a free basic tutorial on how to make leather tassels that you can use to dress up any of your projects. If you’re looking for jewelry projects that make use of this tassel, check out the dangle tassel earrings, the geometric tassel necklace, or the leather tassel bracelet all included in the book!

TasselsMaterials


Tools

  • 1 cutting knife
  • Cutting blades
  • 1 cutting mat
  • 1 disappearing fabric marker
  • 1 ruler
  • Cyanoacrylate glue
  • Leather bond glue


Instructions

1. Gather all of the materials and tools listed.

Tassel12. Copy shapes A and B from the template on a separate sheet of paper. Then cut out the shapes using a cutting blade or scissors. Note the pink dotted lines that can be used as a guide when measuring tassel cuts.

3. Place shapes A and B on top of the leather and cut around. Shape A is the leather tassel, and shape B is the loop you can use to attach the finished tassel to your project.

 

 

tassel34. Using a disappearing fabric marker and a ruler, or the pink dashed lines on the template, make small marks along the bottom edge of the back side of the leather at each 1⁄16 inch (1.5 mm). Marking on the back side prevents the marks from showing on the finished side. The 1⁄16-inch (1.5 mm) marks determine the width of each strand of the tassel. Feel free to make the cuts wider or narrower depending on preference.

5. Again working on the back side of the leather, measure down from the top edge 1⁄4 inch (6 mm), and draw a very light line with the disappearing marker. Along this line make 1⁄16-inch (1.5 mm) marks corresponding to the marks made along the bottom edge.

tassel46. With the ruler, cut parallel, straight lines from the top marks to the bottom marks and through the bottom edge. Make sure not to cut all the way to the top.

7. Repeat to create two or more tassels depending on your need. If the guide marks made from steps 4 and 5 are visible, use a cutting blade to scrape them off.

 

 

tassel58. Working on the back side of the leather, align one short end of shape B on the top left edge of the tassel cutout, and use cyanoacrylate glue to adhere. Fold shape B in half to create a loop and glue again. The loop is used to connect the jump ring and ear wire to the tassel. Repeat for the second tassel.

 

 

 

tassel69. On the back side of the leather, spread a narrow band of leather bond glue along the top edge of the tassel cutout stopping 1⁄4 inch (6 mm) from the end. This helps to strengthen the tassel. Hold the top of the loop, and roll tightly to create the tassel. Keep rolling until 1⁄4 inch (6 mm) is left. Add cyanoacrylate glue to the end, and finish rolling. The glue will help keep the tassel from unrolling. Repeat for the second tassel.

 

 

 
 
 
 
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Throwback Thursday: Millie Marotta Easter Eggs!

March 17, 2016, 10:00 am  Posted by Ardi Alspach
 

The egg-decorating fun doesn’t have to end after the eggs are dyed. Last year, Martha Stewart Online asked Millie Marotta, illustrator of the book Millie Marotta’s Animal Kingdom: Color Me, Draw Me , to produce some Easter-themed line drawings for a fun egg decorating project! We’re sharing it with you again so you can take advantage of this free project as you decorate for Easter and Spring this year.

Sources
Durable decoupage finish, by Martha Stewart Crafts, in Matte, $10 for 8 oz.

how-to-illustrated-egg-654-d111784_vertMATERIALS
Detail scissors
Matte découpage finish and paintbrush
Dyed eggs
Fine-tipped markers
Coloring-book illustrations

STEPS
1. Download and print out Marotta’s coloring-book illustrations. Cut closely around shapes with detail scissors.

2. For each egg, brush back of drawing with a thin coat of découpage finish. Place illustration where desired on dyed egg; smooth down with your fingers.

3. Let dry 1 hour, then color in design with markers.