0 Comments
 

SeedBeadChic Poster_LowRes 2Attention Georgia beaders! Beadjoux Bead Store (Braselton, GA) is pleased to announce a special weekend of events with Lark author and bead artist Amy Katz.   The weekend of October 10-12 will be reserved for a book signing, trunk show party and two classes taught exclusively by Amy Katz.

 

Amy Katz has been beading for 20 years and teaches beading workshops and classes across the country. Her designs revolve around the “high-end” jewelry store look using quality seed beads, crystals, pearls, and more. She is the author of the new Seed Bead Chic (Oct. 2014), and her website is BeadJourney.com. She lives in Fairfax Station, VA.

 

The weekend of events will begin with a book signing and trunk show party on Friday October 10 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.  Amy will be signing her new book, Seed Bead Chic.  It features 25 upscale and elegant projects that look like the fine jewelry you would find in high-end boutiques.  This book is a must have for every beader!  Hors d’oeuvres will be served throughout the book signing.

 

Saturday October 11 and Sunday October 12 will be reserved for classes taught by Amy Katz.  Amy will be teaching her Slide Baby Slide bracelet design on Saturday and her Elena’s Necklace design on Sunday.

 

For more information about the weekend events featuring Amy Katz, please contact:

Beadjoux Bead Store
6750 Highway 53
Suite 103
Braselton, GA 30517
706-658-0007
http://www.beadjoux.com/

 

 

 
 
 
 
0 Comments

Take a look inside the new Beading All-Stars

September 10, 2014, 20:14 pm  Posted by Jill Jarnow
 

coverPrepare to cheer for Lark’s new bead book: Beading All-Stars (Sept. 2014)!

 

It’s a goldmine of diverse and stunning projects by eleven of the most talented bead weavers around. If you are a confirmed bead weaver, you’ll be blown away by Beading All-Stars, which hit stores this month. In it, you’ll find in it the awesome beading designs of Marcia DeCoster, Jamie Cloud Eakin, Mabeline Gidez, Diane Hyde, Glenda Paunonen,& Liisa Turunen, Melissa Grakowsky Shippee, Sherry Serafini, Amy Katz, Rachel Nelson-Smith, and Anneta Valious.

 

With twenty unique projects in a wonderful range of looks and colors, Beading All-Stars delivers a rich and varied choice of designs in a single volume. With the complete step-by-step instructions, you’ll be able to choose beading projects according to your mood, your sense of style, or when you’re ready to bead a very special piece for a very, very dear friend.

 

Since I’ll be drooling over Beading All-Stars several times in the next few months, I’m going to pace myself by describing just a few of the projects and their authors right now. More will follow next month. Today I’m concentrating on the work of Marcia DeCoster, Jamie Cloud Eakin, and Mabeline Gidez.

——————————————————————————————————————————————————–

In Beading All-Stars, the diverse and revered Marcia DeCoster (www.marciadecoster.com) serves up two steely metal-colored beaded pieces that are right out of the Jazz Age. Her “Deco Bracelet” and “Erté Earrings,” both with a geometric theme, are perfect accessories for the person who loves to wear the contemporary versions of the swingy Jazz Age look, embraced by women in the 1920s who enjoyed dancing the Charleston. But you don’t have to be a flapper to wear these glamorous, silvery designs. They will look equally elegant with today’s fashions. In fact, they will add a layer of sophistication to everything you wear.

 

Deco Bracelet_5

 Deco Bracelet

 

Erte Earring_10

Erte Earrings

——————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Jamie Cloud Eakin (www.StudioJamie.com) has designed the delicate, elegant “Flower Garden Bracelet” with orderly rows of pearly white beads and grass green leaf-shaped beads. She uses soft turquoise flower beads to create a bezel that surrounds a central, soft green cabochon. With the overall effect of a seventeenth-century French garden, this bracelet will add pizzazz to a lace dress, a summer outfit featuring white, green, or turquoise slacks or shorts, and even a wool sweater.

 

Flower Garden Bracelet_16

Flower Garden Bracelet

 

Jamie’s “Spring In Bloom Necklace,” a concerto in gray transparent luster, jade, and amethyst beads, is a delicious five-strand confection complete with shaped, bezeled charms and a large bezeled cabochon and flower pendant. For beaders who love to wear today’s multi-stand look in jewelry, this is an extraordinary, gorgeous piece.

 

Spring Necklace_19

Spring In Bloom Necklace

——————————————————————————————————————————————————–

For a sparkly, multi-colored, flower look, Mabeline Gidez (www.MabelineDesigns.com) has created “The Chrysa Bracelet.” Inspired by the multi-petaled chrysanthemum, the centerpiece of Mabeline Gidez’s irresistible bracelet is a flower made of concentric beaded petal patterns that bring the flower into three dimensions. The rose, lavender purple and violet iridescent sparkle of this bracelet is a delicious feast for the eyes.

 

Chrysa Bracelet_27 Chrysa Bracelet

 

Mabeline’s olive, gold and aqua “Mystic Sun Earrings,” which glow with inner light, pay tribute to the sun as well as to the precision of the stonework practiced by the Incas. These earrings will glitter and glow like the sun as they dangle from the ears of the lucky person who gets to wear them.

 

Mystic Sun_34

Mystic Sun Earrings

 

Check back here soon for more great pieces from Lark’s Beading All-Stars. And be sure to order your copy of this inspiring book today!

 

 
 
 
 
0 Comments
 

Tune in this Monday, August 18 from 10am-noon EST to see Candie Cooper present projects from her new book, Earringology  (Lark Crafts, $24.95, June 2014) on JTV’s Jewel School. She’ll be presenting a variety of techniques from knotting to easy metalworking alongside trendy materials like leather and silk.

 

You can watch live online at Jewelry TV, or use their Channel Finder to tell you where you can view in your area.

 

About the book:

In her stunning follow up to Necklaceology, Candie Cooper creates 50 beautiful beaded earring projects that are fun for both beginners and seasoned beaders. Stylish and feminine, they work for the office, a night on the town, or a casual weekend. In addition to beads and wire, these lovely pieces of jewelry include leather, clay, charms, found objects, and other fun materials. Cooper’s accessible instructions on tools and techniques, plus plenty of detailed photos, guide you every step of the way.

 

About the author:

Candie Cooper is a jewelry designer with a passion for unique materials and color combinations, inspired by her extensive travel and years living in China. She is the author of several jewelry books with Lark, including Necklaceology and Metalworking 101 for Beaders. Candie hosts the public television series Hands On, has appeared as a featured guest on PBS’s popular Beads, Baubles, and Jewels, and teaches creative workshops nationally. She currently lives in Wabash, IN.

 

Check out some of Candie’s beautiful earring designs below:

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
0 Comments

Margie Deeb Challenges You…

July 08, 2014, 05:37 am  Posted by Lark
 

The Beader’s Guide to Jewelry Design, written by Margie Deeb, teaches you to design your own creations by paying attention to unity, scale, proportion, balance, rhythm, shape, pattern, texture, movement, drape, and color. You’ll explore the interaction of jewelry and the body: how it moves, how it drapes, how it guides the viewer’s eye to complement–or clash–with different body sizes and wardrobe. The concepts presented are supported by photos, illustrations, before-and-after examples, and challenges. Tips from today’s leading jewelry designers in polymer clay, beads, precious metal clay, ceramic, and wire teach you how to take your ideas and refine them into extraordinary, wearable jewelry.

  • Discover why a piece of jewelry is visually appealing.
  • Understand why you prefer certain styles and how to apply the concepts to achieve what you want.
  • Gain confidence in using specific applications of visual and aesthetic principles.
  • Be inspired to grow and express more of yourself and your unique visions of beauty.

 

This is the last of a nine-part interview (whew!) with the author.

Q Each chapter ends with a Challenge Yourself page that’s kind of like fun homework assignments. Tell me about those.

A I love homework and assignments. And I am so irritated by books that tell you how to do something without providing exercises to practice it! I love putting into practice what I learn, without the pressure of having to create a masterpiece. That’s what these challenges are: they’ll compel you to apply what you’ve learned in each chapter. And they’ll inspire you to stretch beyond comfortable boundaries.

 

For example, at the end of Chapter 3: Balance, the “Challenge Yourself” section asks you to consider symmetrical balance, something you’ve probably worked with all your life, more carefully. I write the following:

  • Browse jewelry catalogs or websites for examples of vertical and horizontal symmetry. Find examples that simultaneously display both. Which kind of symmetry do you find more in earrings? Necklaces? Bracelets?
  • Sketch several pair of earring designs using vertical symmetry.
  • Do the same using horizontal symmetry.
  • Sketch several pair of earring designs using both vertical and horizontal symmetry simultaneously.
  •  Vertical symmetry is common in necklaces and earrings. Horizontal symmetry isn’t as common, and is rarely seen without vertical symmetry also being present. How do you feel about horizontal symmetry in a necklace or in earrings?

 

Most jewelry designers haven’t considered the difference in impact that vertical or horizontal balance has on their jewelry, or on the way that jewelry looks when it is being worn. Understanding these concepts and their visual ramifications improves your ability, expands your options, and helps you become more creative.

Click on this image to link to a PDF of these pages

 ***

Margie Deeb is the author of four other books. For more info about her new one, check out http://beadersguidetojewelrydesign.com


 
 
 
 
1 Comments

Take a Creative Journey with Margie Deeb

July 01, 2014, 05:45 am  Posted by Lark
 

The Beader’s Guide to Jewelry Design, written by Margie Deeb, teaches you to design your own creations by paying attention to unity, scale, proportion, balance, rhythm, shape, pattern, texture, movement, drape, and color. You’ll explore the interaction of jewelry and the body: how it moves, how it drapes, how it guides the viewer’s eye to complement–or clash–with different body sizes and wardrobe. The concepts presented are supported by photos, illustrations, before-and-after examples, and challenges. Tips from today’s leading jewelry designers in polymer clay, beads, precious metal clay, ceramic, and wire teach you how to take your ideas and refine them into extraordinary, wearable jewelry.

  • Discover why a piece of jewelry is visually appealing.
  • Understand why you prefer certain styles and how to apply the concepts to achieve what you want.
  • Gain confidence in using specific applications of visual and aesthetic principles.
  • Be inspired to grow and express more of yourself and your unique visions of beauty.

 

This is the eighth in a nine-part interview with the author.

Q In Chapter 8: The Creative Journey, you discuss fear and doubt. How come, Margie? Isn’t beading all about having fun and being creative?

A All truly creative pursuits are accompanied by some degree of fear or doubt. Fear and doubt are evidence of being challenged. I’ve never completed a project in my life in which I haven’t doubted myself, sometimes for a few moments, and other times severely.

 

 

I don’t see or hear enough discussion out there about fear, doubt, and failure (which is also part of the process). And because of that, people new to design get the message that if they doubt themselves, it proves they aren’t capable. I hate those consequences. It’s so important to accept the process. And the process includes fear, doubt, and failure. In the book I present the most effective ways I know to deal with them.

If someone doesn’t experience fear or doubt while executing a creative project, that person isn’t challenging themselves. He or she isn’t pushing out of the comfort zone.

One of the most exciting sections of this chapter addresses finding your artistic voice. I designed a worksheet to help you clarify your motivation and strengths. This will be so valuable to anyone, regardless of their skill level.

 

 

Q You include brief interviews with Sherry Serafini, Frieda Bates, Marcia DeCoster, Barbara Becker Simon, Jamie Cloud Eakin, Heidi Kummli, Diane Fitzgerald and Robin Atkins. How did you select these artists, and what are the interviews about?

A The most powerful way to become a master at any art form, including jewelry design, is to structure your creative process. Honing our creative process is something we all must do as artists. And it differs for every artist. I talk a little about mine and how I manage my energy and time. I wanted to present other artists’ methods as well, so I chose prolific artists who I consider masters. It was such fun reading how others work! And it both validated some of my own practices, and inspired me to try new ones.

 

Click on this image to link to a PDF of these pages

 

 

Check in next Tuesday for the last segment of this interview with Margie!

 ***

Margie Deeb is the author of four other beading books. For more info about her new one, check out http://beadersguidetojewelrydesign.com


 
 
 
 
1 Comments

Margie Deeb Talks About Jewelry & the Body

June 24, 2014, 05:33 am  Posted by Lark
 

The Beader’s Guide to Jewelry Design, written by Margie Deeb, teaches you to design your own creations by paying attention to unity, scale, proportion, balance, rhythm, shape, pattern, texture, movement, drape, and color. You’ll explore the interaction of jewelry and the body: how it moves, how it drapes, how it guides the viewer’s eye to complement–or clash–with different body sizes and wardrobe. The concepts presented are supported by photos, illustrations, before-and-after examples, and challenges. Tips from today’s leading jewelry designers in polymer clay, beads, precious metal clay, ceramic, and wire teach you how to take your ideas and refine them into extraordinary, wearable jewelry.

  • Discover why a piece of jewelry is visually appealing.
  • Understand why you prefer certain styles and how to apply the concepts to achieve what you want.
  • Gain confidence in using specific applications of visual and aesthetic principles.
  • Be inspired to grow and express more of yourself and your unique visions of beauty.

 

This is the seventh in a nine-part interview with the author.

Q The chapters about the major principles of design are followed by Chapter 7: Jewelry and The Body. Tell me about this section, Margie.

A This is my favorite chapter in the book! It’s so very important to consider how jewelry interacts with the body, not just how it looks in a photo or on a display form. Too often that’s all we see because we’re looking at static photos. And unfortunately, many bead artists disregard the wearer’s size, coloring, skin tone, shape, and comfort when making jewelry. This chapter presents information that has never been published, material I’ve spent decades learning and gathering. Chapter 7 is worth the price of the entire book, in my opinion. It includes info on how to design necklaces for specific fashion necklines, body shapes and sizes, face structure, and more.

 

 

 

I’ve developed a “Customer Preference Form” to copy and fill out when you’re designing for specific clients. You can use it to capture all you need to know about your customer, including measurements, allergies, color preferences, and more.

 


 Q Does the success of jewelry on the body have to do with proportion?

A In large part, yes. When a woman is overwhelmed by jewelry, it often looks comical. When a woman wears jewelry that can barely be seen, it can look odd and unflattering. The proportions within the piece jewelry are so important, too. A huge focal bead on a flimsy strand (something I see far too often) appears painfully out of proportion. We cover those kind of proportions in the Balance chapter.

 

Click on this image to link to a PDF of these pages

 

Check in next Tuesday for the eighth part of this interview with Margie!

 ***

Margie Deeb is the author of four other beading books. For more info about her newest one, check out http://beadersguidetojewelrydesign.com


 
 
 
 
1 Comments

Shape & Color, with Margie Deeb

June 17, 2014, 05:31 am  Posted by Lark
 

The Beader’s Guide to Jewelry Design, written by Margie Deeb, teaches you to design your own creations by paying attention to unity, scale, proportion, balance, rhythm, shape, pattern, texture, movement, drape, and color. You’ll explore the interaction of jewelry and the body: how it moves, how it drapes, how it guides the viewer’s eye to complement–or clash–with different body sizes and wardrobe. The concepts presented are supported by photos, illustrations, before-and-after examples, and challenges. Tips from today’s leading jewelry designers in polymer clay, beads, precious metal clay, ceramic, and wire teach you how to take your ideas and refine them into extraordinary, wearable jewelry.

  • Discover why a piece of jewelry is visually appealing.
  • Understand why you prefer certain styles and how to apply the concepts to achieve what you want.
  • Gain confidence in using specific applications of visual and aesthetic principles.
  • Be inspired to grow and express more of yourself and your unique visions of beauty.

 

Margie Deeb

This is the sixth in a nine-part interview with Margie.                   

Q How is shape important, Margie?

A As we wear a carefully crafted shape of beauty—for that is exactly what jewelry is—it becomes an expression and extension of who we are. Shape contributes to that expression. When you look at a piece of jewelry from a distance, its shape is the first thing you see. You can’t discern individual beads or intricate surface embellishment. Your eye immediately perceives just the essential shape.

Obsessed as bead artists are with surface embellishment, it can be tempting to minimize the importance of the shape of the jewelry we’re designing so we can get to the “good stuff,” the intricacies of stitch wizardry and surface ornamentation. When this kind of myopia is in place, design suffers. The most extraordinary beads woven into fascinating patterns amount to little if they’re part of a sloppy or confusing shape.

So I encourage everyone to fall in love with shapes: learn all you can about their movement, style, and language. Your jewelry will be more beautiful because of it.

Click on this image to link to a PDF of these pages

 

 

Q It seems color would be the most important principle for a piece of jewelry. Isn’t that the first thing people notice?                           

A Most often, yes. But it depends on the distance the jewelry is being seen from. When seen up close, color does compose the major impact of a piece. When looking at a piece of beadwork, a viewer will accept or reject it in less than 30 seconds. The colors account for 60 percent of that decision. Consider the jewelry on magazine covers: color provides the over-riding emotional tone. But when seen from a bit of a distance, even just another foot or two, it’s the shape of the jewelry that our eye immediately discerns. That’s why a whole chapter of my book is devoted to shape.

I devote another chapter to color. Our reaction to color is emotional and visceral. Our “heart” reacts strongly and we feel the response in our bodies. Likewise, the colors we choose for our jewelry elicit emotional, gut-level responses from others. Color, and color alone, can infuse your creations with the ability to astonish.

Color is critical to the artist because it’s one of the most powerful notes in your artistic voice. Your unique sense of color, cultivated and nurtured, becomes a signature of who you are.

 

 

 

Check in next Tuesday for the seventh part of my interview with Margie!

 ***

Margie Deeb is the author of five beading books. For more info about her newest one, check out http://beadersguidetojewelrydesign.com


 
 
 
 
35 Comments

Earringology Giveaway

June 12, 2014, 09:00 am  Posted by joshglickman
 

To celebrate the publication of Candie Cooper’s Earringology, we’re giving away a copy of the book and a pair of handcrafted earrings designed by the author! The earrings are base metal parts with Swarovski crystal droplets.

In her stunning follow up to Necklaceology, Candie Cooper creates 50 beautiful beaded earring projects that are fun for both beginners and seasoned beaders. Stylish and feminine, they work for the office, a night on the town, or a casual weekend. In addition to beads and wire, these lovely pieces of jewelry include leather, clay, charms, found objects, and other fun materials. Cooper’s accessible instructions on tools and techniques, plus plenty of detailed photos, guide you every step of the way.

Candie Cooper is a jewelry designer with a passion for unique materials and color combinations, inspired by her extensive travel and years living in China. She is the author of several jewelry books with Lark, including Necklaceology and Metalworking 101 for Beaders. Candie hosts the public television series Hands On, has appeared as a featured guest on PBS’s popular Beads, Baubles, and Jewels, and teaches creative workshops nationally. She currently lives in Wabash, IN.

ENTER TO WIN OUR EARRINGOLOGY PRIZE PACKAGE!

Includes:

* A copy of the Earringology book

* A pair of handcrafted earrings from the book

Just leave a comment on this blog post by 9 pm EST on Thursday, June 19th. Winners will be selected by Friday, June 20th. Click here for the official rules. Show us some Lark love, and we’ll return the favor!

 
 
 
 
0 Comments

You Move Me, Margie Deeb

June 10, 2014, 05:30 am  Posted by Lark
 

The Beader’s Guide to Jewelry Design, written by Margie Deeb, teaches you to design your own creations by paying attention to unity, scale, proportion, balance, rhythm, shape, pattern, texture, movement, drape, and color. You’ll explore the interaction of jewelry and the body: how it moves, how it drapes, how it guides the viewer’s eye to complement–or clash–with different body sizes and wardrobe. The concepts presented are supported by photos, illustrations, before-and-after examples, and challenges. Tips from today’s leading jewelry designers in polymer clay, beads, precious metal clay, ceramic, and wire teach you how to take your ideas and refine them into extraordinary, wearable jewelry.

  • Discover why a piece of jewelry is visually appealing.
  • Understand why you prefer certain styles and how to apply the concepts to achieve what you want.
  • Gain confidence in using specific applications of visual and aesthetic principles.
  • Be inspired to grow and express more of yourself and your unique visions of beauty.

 

This is the fifth in a nine-part interview with Margie Deeb.                          

Q Why did you include a chapter on movement?

A Movement is something I’ve never seen written about, even though it’s critical to beautiful jewelry: Movement makes art come alive. We know physical movement well, the kind that occurs when beaded fringe sways or metal charms shimmy. Physical movement is obvious. There is, however, another kind of movement—one less tangible, one that doesn’t physically move. We sense this intangible movement more often than we see it.

 

Click on the image above to link to a PDF of these pages

 

It is the movement—physical or intangible—in jewelry that initially calls to and captures the viewer: the sparkle of a reflective facet, the sinuous curve of an element, the beat-like percussion of a repetitive pattern. In this chapter we examine the movement of light, pattern, line, shape, texture, and color. We dicuss the “musical”  effects of visual rhythm, repetition, and space.

 

 

I love studying intangible movement because it involves intuition and feeling rather than anything physically measurable. I wrote: “Intangible movement and visual rhythm dwell in the realm of feeling and the senses—slightly elusive, slightly mysterious, perfect for evoking mood. You can create tension by repeating angular elements. Smaller elements can create more rapid movement. Imbue a piece with tranquility by using long, curvilinear shapes and motifs in horizontal positions. To speed up movement, increase the repetition with progressively shorter intervals. To slow it down, do the opposite.”

 

Which kind of repeated line makes you feel more calm? Which moves faster? Does one seem older than the other?

 

Visit this blog next Tuesday for the next part of the interview with Margie!

***

Margie Deeb is the author of five beading books. For more info about her newest one, check out http://beadersguidetojewelrydesign.com


 
 
 
 
0 Comments

Margie Deeb Stays Balanced

June 03, 2014, 05:29 am  Posted by Lark
 

Today is the official release of The Beader’s Guide to Jewelry Design, by Margie Deeb! Congratulations, Margie!

This information-packed book teaches you to design your own creations by paying attention to unity, scale, proportion, balance, rhythm, shape, pattern, texture, movement, drape, and color. You’ll explore the interaction of jewelry and the body: how it moves, how it drapes, how it guides the viewer’s eye to complement–or clash–with different body sizes and wardrobe. The concepts presented are supported by photos, illustrations, before-and-after examples, and challenges. Tips from today’s leading jewelry designers in polymer clay, beads, precious metal clay, ceramic, and wire teach you how to take your ideas and refine them into extraordinary, wearable jewelry.

  • Discover why a piece of jewelry is visually appealing.
  • Understand why you prefer certain styles and how to apply the concepts to achieve what you want.
  • Gain confidence in using specific applications of visual and aesthetic principles.
  • Be inspired to grow and express more of yourself and your unique visions of beauty.

 

This is the fourth in a nine-part interview with Margie Deeb.
Q Tell us about balance as it applies to jewelry design.
A When something is visually off-balance, we feel it. In my book we explore ways to achieve visual balance (both symmetrical and asymmetrical) because balance takes us a step further in achieving the unity we seek in jewelry design.

 

Click on this image to link to a PDF of these pages

 

In this chapter we explore all kinds of balance: radial, vertical, horizontal, symmetrical. We discuss what kinds of balance harmonize best with the body. We look at why asymmetrical balance can be so compelling. We examine balance of composition and of movement. There are so many ways to play with balance, and we explore achieving it through value, color, positioning of elements, texture, pattern, shape, and movement.

 

 

Q What do you mean by “balance through value or color”?

A Darker colors—those with lower value—are visually heavier than lighter colors. You can use a larger area of a lighter color to counterbalance a small area of dark. Now, balancing dark and light is relatively simple. When you add color into the equation, it becomes more complex. With color we need to consider luminosity—the brilliance of a color. A color’s brightness affects visual weight.

A small amount of a darker or muted (less saturated, more dull) color can counterbalance an expanse of a lighter color. But when luminosity comes into play we need to look more carefully. Bright, luminous colors demand more attention than colors that are simply lighter.

Balance through Value

In the illustration on the left (above), the smallest circle is dark (visually heavy), so it balances all three lighter, larger circles. The positioning of lights and darks balances the composition. In the drawing on the right, the dark circle in the earring balances the whole circle because its visual weight is equal to the crescent and the lightest circle.

 

Check back next Tuesday for the next part of this interview with Margie Deeb.

 ***

Margie Deeb is the author of five beading books. For more info about her newest one, check out http://beadersguidetojewelrydesign.com