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The Penland Book of Jewelry: Master Classes in Jewelry Techniques

Back in 2005, Lark’s senior editor handed me an advance copy of The Penland Book of Jewelry and said, “Congratulations on your Masters thesis.” She was joking, of course, but her comment was somewhat true.

I had never worked on such an ambitious project, and I had many reservations. Coordinating 10 authors and 10 photo shoots, each in a different city, was daunting. (I had to buy a wall-sized dry erase board just to manage the details!) The final product, however, exceeded my expectations and remains one of my favorite books to this day.

Fast forward six years…and, drum roll, please…The Penland Book of Jewelry is now available in paperback! (One of those fancy Flexi-bind paperbacks that stays open flat on your bench.)

The book includes many red-hot techniques, such as electroforming, die forming, casting, and fabricating with steel, all presented by celebrated metalsmiths who have taught workshops at The Penland School of Crafts.

Marilyn daSilva, The Trouble with Magic

Marilyn daSilva, The Trouble with Magic

John Cogswell, Tomato Server

John Cogswell, Tomato Server

Rob Jackson, Chanterelle, 2007

Rob Jackson, Chanterelle

The table of contents reads like a “Who’s Who” of American studio jewelry.

Marilyn da Silva Nontraditional Color on MetalJohn Cogswell ForgingJaime Pellisier Alloying Rob Jackson Fabricating with SteelHeather White van Stolk CastingJan Baum Die Forming Tom McCarthy Alternative Stone Setting Maria Phillips ElectroformingMary Ann Scherr Etching Douglas Harling Granulation •

Jaime Pellisier, Inca Road I

Jaime Pellisier, Inca Road I

Jan Baum, 100% Pure

Jan Baum, 100% Pure

Mary Ann Scherr, Weddings Rings

Mary Ann Scherr, Weddings Rings

Each chapter begins with an introduction that covers the author’s history, journey, and growth as a maker. Next, each chapter offers a hands-on, highly illustrated, and beautifully photographed guide to the technique they have mastered. Finally, each chapter closes with a gallery of inspiring images by other jewelers utilizing the featured technique.

Tom McCarthy, Tucky Pendant, 2005

Tom McCarthy, Tucky Pendant

Heather White van Stolk, Honeysuckle Torque, 2006

Heather White van Stolk, Honeysuckle Torque

Maria Phillips

Maria Phillips

Douglas Harling, Licorice Bee

Douglas Harling Licorice Bee

If you wish to take your skills to the next level, learn a new technique to add to your repertoire, or simply see some fantastic jewelery makers at work, The Penland Book of Jewelry is just the ticket.

PS: The Penland School of Crafts offers short, one- and two-week workshops in the summer and 8-week workshops in the Fall and Spring. To see Penland’s Summer 2011 jewelry and metal workshops, click here. For their iron workshops, click here.

Have you ever taken or taught a workshop at Penland? Share your memories in the comment box!

 
 
 
 

3 Responses

    Tom McCarthy says:

    Has it really been six years? It was a real pleasure working with you and Lark. As I recall Nathalie was quite involved as well.
    I hadn’t pictured the giant whiteboard but I knew there must have been some fancy choreography going on!

    I together with my buddies came looking through the excellent helpful tips from the website and then suddenly got a terrible suspicion I had not thanked the site owner for those tips. Most of the women are actually certainly excited to read through all of them and have definitely been making the most of them. Appreciation for being so kind as well as for deciding upon certain really good subjects most people are really eager to understand about. My personal honest apologies for not saying thanks to you sooner.

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