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Free Project: Kinterra Cowl by Carol J. Sulcoski

November 10, 2016, 15:32 pm  Posted by Ardi Alspach
 

KinterraCowl copySelf-striping yarn is increasingly popular with crafters, but many knitters lack the knowledge to work with the yarn effectively. Carol Sulcoski’s latest book, Self-Striping Yarn Studio (Order Here >> B&N, Amazon, IndieBound), begins with a comprehensive technical section that explains how to use and manipulate self-striping yarn, something no previous pattern collection has offered. After reading the accessible instructions and tips, knitters will be inspired to cast on one of 24 new and original designs. Get a taste of what this book has to offer with this free pattern, not included in the book!

button2Kinterra Cowl by Carol J. Sulcoski
Skill Level: Easy

FINISHED MEASUREMENTS
Approx 81″/206cm long by 6 1⁄2″/16.5cm wide after blocking

 

MATERIALS AND TOOLS

  • Black Bunny Fibers Stripey Sock (75% superwash merino, 25% nylon; 3 1⁄2 oz/100g = 450yd/411m); 1 skein color perky rainbow (A)—approx 400yd/366m of self-striping fingering weight yarn superfine
  • Kraemer Yarns Rachel (100% superwash merino; 3 1⁄2 oz/100g = 425yd/389m); 1 skein color natural (B)—approx 400yd/366m of solid fingering weight yarn superfine
  • Knitting needles: 3.25mm (size 3 U.S.) needles or size to obtain gauge
  • Tapestry needle

 

GAUGE
Approx 28 sts/32 rows = 4″/10cm in Stockinette stitch, before blocking.
Gauge is not essential for this project.

Note: Carry color not in use along edge to avoid breaking yarn.

 

INSTRUCTIONS
First Section:

With yarn A, CO 50 sts. Purl 1 row.

Row 1: With yarn A, k3, yo, k2tog, k to last 5 sts, k2tog, yo, k3.

Row 2: Purl.

Repeat these 2 rows using yarn A.

Change to yarn B and work these 2 rows twice more.

Repeat these 8 rows until cowl measures 27″/68.5cm and ending with Row 8.

Second Section:

Cont in the same manner, working 6 rows in A and 2 rows in B until cowl measures 54″/137cm.

 Third Section:

Cont in same manner, working 2 rows in A and 2 rows in B until cowl measures 81″/206cm.

BO all sts, leaving long tail for seaming.

 

FINISHING

Weave in all ends except long tail for seaming, and block.

Sew CO edge to BO edge.

Note: If you wish, you can seam the cowl; give the cowl a twist and then seam it for a mobius effect; or leave the cowl unseamed and wear as a scarf—knitter’s choice!

 

Self Striping Yarn StudioABOUT THE AUTHOR

Carol J. Sulcoski is a knitwear designer, writer, hand dyer, and teacher. Her books include Sock Yarn Studio (Lark), Lace Yarn Studio (Lark), Knit So Fine (Interweave), and Knitting Socks with Handpainted Yarns (Interweave). Carol’s work has also appeared in such magazines as Vogue Knitting, KnitSimple, Interweave Knits, KnitScene, and Noro Magazine. Carol’s hand-dyed yarns can be purchased at blackbunnyfibers.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
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Bring on the Luck of the Irish!

March 04, 2016, 12:00 pm  Posted by Diana Ventimiglia
 

61Ou85QzfeLAs some of you might know from last year’s post, St. Patrick’s Day is a big deal in my family. Over the years I’ve donned everything green, ate all the corned beef and humiliated my friends with ‘Kiss Me I’m Irish’ pins. This year, I wanted to do something different with my affinity for the holiday.

Well, I didn’t need to look very far for inspiration. Aimee Ray’s Doodle Stitching The Holiday Motif Collection was sitting right on my desk, daring me to get creative. For those of you who haven’t seen this book, I suggest you get your hands on it. It’s filled with over 300 embroidery motifs designed specifically for the holidays and seasons. It even comes with a CD with all of the motifs in simple black lines so you can enlarge, edit or combine them as you like!

The book has the perfect motifs for St. Patrick’s Day. You can add them to tea towels, clothes, tote bags, pillows, and your own personalized cards. Below are a few to wet your shamrocks. I plan on adding that leprechaun to the elbows of my green sweater this year!

You can also download the black lined PDFs of these motifs here: LeprechaunPot of Gold, and Shamrock. Grab a copy for you or a loved one now!

Buy here: Barnes and Noble, Amazon, IndieBound

Continue reading...
 
 
 
 
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Make a Cute Felt Ornament for Your Tree

December 08, 2015, 10:00 am  Posted by guestblogger
 

by Ellen B. Wright

Why are felt ornaments so awesome? Here are five reasons!

  1. They’re quick! It’s easy to finish a few in an afternoon.
  2. They’re cheap! Buy craft-sized squares of felt in a variety of colors for under a dollar at your local craft store (or online).
  3. They’re cute! There are all sorts of adorable patterns out there, including Lark’s very own Fa la la la Felt and ‘Tis the Season to Be Felt-y. They’ll look great on your tree or make great gifts.
  4. They’re easy! Simpler designs are accessible for beginning sewers, but still turn out looking good.
  5. They’re customizable! Simpler designs aren’t the only designs; we ambitious crafters can tackle more intricate styles.

You’ll be able to handle the basics once you’ve finished reading this short post. If you know how to thread a needle and stitch a basic running stitch, you’re more than prepared to make some adorable felt ornaments. (Back stitch, mattress stitch, and satin stitch will give you more options, if you know them or want to learn them, and tutorials are included in the books listed above.)

 

Designs

Felt ornaments run the gamut from completely flat to three-dimensional — almost like a stuffed animal. The most common variety, though, are the ones with a two-dimensional design but just a bit of shape. The base for that look: a front and back and a tiny amount of stuffing.

This tutorial will show you how to make two ornaments on the simpler side. The first: two triangles in green and a rectangle in red or brown — a Christmas tree! Second: two circles of a bright, matching color plus a rectangle of white at the top, and you’ve got a flattened version of a round Christmas bauble, a classic tree ornament.

Felt ornament 1

This year, I made several more complex ornaments: the faces of a Santa, a snowman, and a penguin, all of which started out as plain circles with other shapes added in. You could also make a little scene out of smaller scraps for a felt pseudo-snowglobe. Once you get started, the possibilities are endless.

Felt ornament 2

 

Embellishment

More felt. More felt, in contrasting or complementary colors, is the easiest way to embellish your ornaments. I attached them using a running stitch; you could also use fabric glue.

Ribbons. Plain or patterned, metallic or matte — almost anything would work on the right design. As with the felt, sew or glue it on.

Buttons, etc. We’re going to snazz up our tree with some multicolored buttons. Other similar options: sequins or mini jingle bells!

  1. I used a little bit of embroidery on my circular ornaments to make the Santa’s, reindeer’s and snowman’s eyes. Elegant embroidery contrasts well with the homey feel of felt to make stunning ornaments.

Most of the time, it’s easiest to do the embellishment before you sew the body of the ornament together, though there are exceptions. For my Santa and snowman, for example, I added the hat in after the rest of the ornament is finished.

 

Putting It All Together

1) Cut out two tall isosceles (two sides are the same length and the third is different) triangles of green felt and a square of brown or red felt, for the tree; two circles of a bright color (I’ve used red) and a white square for the baubles.

Felt ornament 3

2) Sew or glue on your embellishments. My tree is decorated with buttons, and the bauble with stripes of felt in other bright colors.

3) Place any pieces that need to stick out — tree trunk, the top of the bauble, ears or antlers, etc. — between the two layers of felt that make up the body of your ornament. Pin them in place.


felt 4 and 5

4) Sew around the outside of the ornament with mattress stitch in a contrasting color (I used black), stitching in any pieces you’ve placed between the two layers as you go. (You could also sew it up with a running stitch or a backstitch if you prefer.) Pause when about an inch is left open.

Felt ornament 6

5) Stuff the ornament lightly through that one-inch hole, then finish sewing around. Give the ornament a good massage to get the stuffing spread evenly.

6) Once you’re happy with your ornament, thread a bit of cord through the top, and you’re ready to hang it on your tree!

felt covers

For more holiday-themed felt ornaments as well as lots of project ideas for stockings, garlands, and decorations, pick up a copy of Fa la la la Felt and ‘Tis the Season to be Felt-y at your local bookstore today!

About the Author:

Ellen B. Wright works as a book publicist in New York City. Her mother taught her to sew, her grandmother taught her to knit, and they both taught her to take Christmas decorating very seriously.

 

 
 
 
 
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Lark Crafts DIY: Operation Easter Knitting

April 03, 2015, 10:07 am  Posted by Connie Santisteban
 

Are you the resident crafter in your family? It’s definitely a badge of honor, but when you’re running late on that Easter basket it turns last-minute crafting into an art form!

 

DIY Easter 1

 

For my niece’s Easter basket I decided to go with a different approach—I wanted something cute and fun, but also useful.

 

Step one: the Bag-sket!

Instead of a traditional basket I decided to make her a reusable bag using Laura Spradlin’s “Grrlfriend Market Bag” free pattern on Ravelry. I used a solid color for the base and handles and a variegated color for the body to produce a bright, fun, machine washable, reusable bag/basket. A bag-sket!

 

DIY Easter 2

 

You’ll be starting at the bottom, center of the bag and working up. Here’s a helpful tutorial for Emily Ocker’s cast-on from New Stitch a Day. It was my first time using this technique, so a tutorial was essential for me.

 

DIY Easter 3

 

Step two: the Easter bunny!

No basket is complete without a furry bunny friend to deliver the holiday goodies. I opted for Susan B. Anderson’s “Rabbit” pattern, which is another free Ravelry download.

 

DIY Easter 4

 

My bunny tail turned out slightly huge, but I say go big or go home and this giant pom helps this guys stand up straight. Win-win!

 

DIY Easter 5

 

Susan also created an absolutely essential video tutorial on embroidering faces to a knitted toy, just the thing I needed to create a simple, but adorable face on this little fella.

 

Step three: the final touch—a carrot!

Easter bunnies get hungry too, y’know? I had a tiny bit of time left so I decided to make a little something for him to nibble on while waiting patiently for Easter Sunday.  I used Emily Ivey’s “Carrot: It’s Good for You” pattern, again another fun, free Ravelry download.

 

DIY Easter 6

 

Mine turned out a liiiiittle ridiculously huge, but what bunny doesn’t love a huge meal?

 

DIY Easter 7

 

(Optional) Step four: bunny scarf

If you’re worried that your bunny will get cold I recommend knitting up a tiny scarf with whatever sport weight yarn scraps you have lying around. Here’s what I did:

–Using any cast-on method, CO enough stitches until you reach 4” (10cm).

–Knit 8 rows

–BO

–Tie on a few strands to each end for fringe

 

DIY Easter 8

 

Quick, cute, and warm. :-)

Now throw in some sweet treats and your bag-sket is ready to go!

 

DIY Easter 9

 

Happy Easter from the Lark family to yours!

 
 
 
 
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We’ve got a wonderful surprise for all of the Stitch Love fans out there! Author Mollie Johanson has provided us with instructions for an adorable embroidered felt lettuce leaf to go along with the Gleeful Guinea Pig Plush project included in the book. Check out the instructions and how-to photos below to make your own, and please post pictures of your Gleeful Guinea Pig munching on her leaf in the comments section. 

If you don’t already have your copy of Stitch Love, order your copy here.  

 

GuineaPigLettuceLeaf1

 

The Gleeful Guinea Pig Plush in Stitch Love: Sweet Creatures Big & Small ended up being one of my favorite projects in the whole book. My sister has claimed this gal for her own, but I thought she looked hungry. Guinea Pigs love lettuce, so I stitched up a felt lettuce leaf for her. And guess what? The Gleeful Guinea Pig loves it!

 

To make your own, you will need:

Green felt

Green embroidery floss

Scissors

Tracing paper

Pencil

Needle

+

 Download the pattern here:

Gleeful Guinea Pig Lettuce Leaf

  GuineaPigLettuceLeaf2

 

For each lettuce leaf, cut two leaf shapes from green felt.

 

GuineaPigLettuceLeaf3

 

Using the tracing paper method given in Stitch Love, embroider the veins onto one of the leaves with back-stitch and three strands of green embroidery floss.

 

GuineaPigLettuceLeaf4

 

Carefully tear away the tracing paper.

 

GuineaPigLettuceLeaf5

 

Hold the two leaf shapes together and stitch around the edge with running stitch and three strands of green embroidery floss. Hide the knot between the layers.

 

GuineaPigLettuceLeaf6   GuineaPigLettuceLeaf7

 

Now you can serve a snack to your favorite stuffed guinea pig!

Stitch love, friends!

 

———-

 

Mollie Johanson is the creator of the popular blog Wild Olive (wildolive.blogspot.com) and Etsy store (where she’s sold over 3000 embroidery motif downloads). Her designs have appeared in Heart-Felt Holidays and Felt-o-ween (both Lark), in magazines (including several features in Mollie Makes), and in craft books from other publishers. Mollie lives in St. Charles, IL.

 
 
 
 
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Join us for a Chunky Knits Knit-a-long!

September 26, 2014, 18:11 pm  Posted by Connie Santisteban
 

Chunky Knits cover (3)Fall is officially here, we’ve entered jacket season, and in about five minutes, it’ll be hat season. Don’t be left out in the cold! Join us for a Chunky Knits knit-a-long (KAL) to make the Button-Up Slouchy Hat and stay warm in the coming months.

 

If you missed it, you can download a free copy of the pattern here.

 

Between the months of October and March slouchy hats are my daily wardrobe staple. I hate it when my ears get cold, so I typically pick my hat patterns based on potential ear coverage. That makes the Button-Up Slouchy Hat perfect for me. See how toasty her ears are?

 

Button-up slouchy hat (5)

 

Fellow Lark editor, Deborah Stack, will be joining me for this mini KAL journey and it’s a notable one for her:

 

“For my entire life, I have struggled to wrangle my curly hair into any sort of order. After many failed attempts to style a hand-knit hat many years ago, I’ve built up the courage to try again. I always wanted a jaunty red hat and a stashed skein of Berroco Ultra Alpaca Chunky in Cardinal seemed to fit the bill.

 

Chunky Knits KAL De#156CEDC (3)

 

While picking up the heart buttons at my LYS, a gorgeous skein of Ella Rae Lace Merino Chunky caught my attention. I couldn’t let this incredible yarn sit alone in the sale bin. Now my worries have extended far beyond how to stuff miles of unruly curls into a knitted hat–I need to pick a color!”

 

Chunky Knits KAL De#156CEA4 (3)

 

As for me, I’ll be casting on with The Plucky Knitter’s Plucky Bulky in the color Hop Diggity and using these adorable bicycle buttons from the famed Jennie the Potter. The yarn was a gift from a dear friend who deeply understands my penchant for green fiber and the buttons are my first purchase from my very first NY Sheep and Wool Festival in Rhinebeck, NY. I’ll be proudly wearing this hat and displaying these buttons in Rhinebeck next month, so they’ll finally come full circle.

 

Chunky Knits KAL Connie yarn and buttons (3)

 

What are your yarn and button plans? Do you have a color preference to help Deborah decide? Let us know your thoughts in the comments. Next week we’ll show you work-in-progress shots.

 

Chunky Knits by Ashley Little will be available starting on October 14th, so be sure to pre-order your copy.

 
 
 
 
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Chunky Knits: Free Sneak Preview Pattern

September 19, 2014, 19:26 pm  Posted by Connie Santisteban
 

Chunky Knits cover (3)What’s not to love about fall? Pumpkin spice lattes, fall foliage, and the handknits finally come out of storage to keep us warm once again. The morning air is turning crisp here in New York City and you know hat weather will be upon us soon.

 

Kick off your fall knitting with the Button-Up Slouchy Hat by Amanda Lilley. Here’s a free sneak preview pattern for you from the forthcoming book Chunky Knits by Ashley Little, publishing on October 14th.

 

Free Download: Chunky Knits – Button-Up Slouchy Hat

 

Button-up slouchy hat (3)

 

I’m definitely eyeing my stash for just the right yarn and buttons to cast on. I think a knit-a-long will be in order soon. Stay tuned!

 

In the meantime, pre-order your copy of Chunky Knits today.

 
 
 
 
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One + One

“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a knitter in possession of two skeins of yarn, must be in want of a striped shawl.”

 

I may be misquoting the first line of Pride and Prejudice, but I would argue that if Jane Austen were a knitter today this is exactly what she’d say. Striped shawls are very on-trend and we’ve got the perfect free pattern for you.

 

The Old and New Shawl uses just two skeins of DK weight yarn and is from Iris Schreier’s latest book, One + One: Wraps, Cowls, & Capelets. Pair a variegated skein with a semi-solid for a similar look to this sample:

 

Old and New Shawl (3)

 

Download your free copy of this pattern here: Old_and_New_Shawl_free_pattern, or store it in your Ravelry library.

 

Be sure to grab your copy of One + One: Wraps, Cowls, & Capelets and cast on today!

 
 
 
 
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Doodle StitchingAdmit it: We’re all guilty of gifting the last-minute, generic card stuffed with some cash as a holiday present—or, if we are feeling fancy, a special Hallmark card with a cash holder—and then feeling the shame of being thoughtless. Well, this holiday season why not give a thoughtful homemade gift, instead? And, there is no other author ready for the challenge than Aimee Ray.

 

The latest installment in her successful Doodle Stitching series is the Holiday Motif Collection arriving in stores this month. Loaded with 20+ projects and over 300 new and original motifs, there are tons of great embroidery ideas and templates focused on the holidays, and other festive seasons as well. To celebrate the release of this wonderful new collection, here’s a look at some of the projects from the book:

 

DS_PHOTO 1 (3)

There are over 20 projects with step-by-step instructions.

 

DS_PHOTO 2 (3)

Following the basics and projects, holiday-themed motifs follow for quick transfers.

DS_PHOTO 3 (4)

Also included are other holiday themes, such as New Year’s and Valentine’s Day patterns.

.

Be sure to order your copy of Doodle Stitching: The Holiday Motif Collection today to get a jump start on your holiday crafts!

 
 
 
 
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Crochet Boutique: Hats — Free Pattern

August 20, 2014, 15:13 pm  Posted by Connie Santisteban
 

While I was walking through the Brooklyn Botanic Garden on Sunday I spotted it—the leaves are starting to turn here in NYC. Yes, it’s still mostly green everywhere, but once you see the first leaves you know that fall is not far behind. That means it’s time to pick up that crochet hook, prepare for the coming cold, and Crochet Boutique: Hats by Rachael Oglesby is the perfect book to restart your fall stitching.

 

I love a brisk fall day, but I don’t love an early sunset. The Neon Pom is the perfect antidote for those of us who will inevitably feel sun starved by winter. We can make our own sunshine, so download your free copy of this pattern here: Neon Pom pattern

 

 

Pre-order your copy of Crochet Boutique: Hats and keep your eyes on this space for a fun giveaway in the coming weeks. Hint: there’s Madelinetosh involved. Yes, I’m excited!