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Gaga for Grannies: Granny Square 101

October 28, 2010, 14:27 pm  Posted by Craft Your Life Team
 

vickiehowellRecently, I went through the attic at my dad’s house where came across a few, forgotten crochet projects I’d made as a child including, a granny square doll’s blanket. All 15 squares and scalloped edge are still in perfect condition (by what I can only assume is the grace of the acrylic yarn it’s made from, because it certainly wasn’t properly stored), making it a well preserved heirloom-cum-drag-around-blankie for my 17-month-old daughter.  Even this

My daughter, holding a granny blanket I made as a child.

semi-cynical, Scorpio found it impossible to not crumble into mush at seeing my real baby wrapped up in the same, handmade piece that had swaddled my pretend babies, *cough*,  25+ years ago. That moment was a gift, for sure. It also got me thinking; as a designer who regularly calls upon the timeless kitsch of the granny square, learning how to crochet them was a gift, too (thanks, mom!) So, to those who haven’t yet hopped on the hook when it comes to this particular crochet skill, I’d like to pay that present forward. From me to you, here’s the scoop on Granny Square 101!

(Oh, a stay tuned next week for a round-up of some of my favorite Granny Square designs.)

How-to Crochet a Granny Square

Tools
Yarn
Crochet Hook
Scissors
Tapestry or Yarn Needle

Abbreviations
ch(s) = chain(s)
dc = double crochet
hdc = half double crochet
sc = single crochet
sl st = slip stitch
sp(s) = space(s)
[ ] = Work directions inside brackets as many times as indicated.
( ) = Work directions inside parenthesis into st or sp indicated.
* Repeat directions following * as many timed as indicated.

WRITTEN DIRECTIONS
Ch 6; join with a sl st to form a ring.

Round 1: Ch 3, (counts as a dc here and throughout), 2 dc in ring, [ch 3, 3 dc in ring] 3 times, ch 3; join with sl st in 3rd ch of beginning ch-3.
Round 2: Ch 5, (counts as dc and ch-2 sp here and throughout), *(3dc, ch 3, 3 dc) in next corner ch-3 sp, ch 2;

Charted Directions

repeat from * 2 more times, (3 dc, ch 3, 2 dc) in first corner ch-3 sp; join with a sl st in 3rd of beginning ch-5.
Round 3: Sl st in next ch-2 sp, ch 3 (counts as dc here and throughout), 2 dc in same ch-2 sp, *ch 2, (3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc) in next corner ch-3 sp, ch 2**, 3 dc in next ch-2 sp; repeat from * 3 more times, ending last repeat at **; join with a sl st in 3rd ch of beginning ch-3.
Round 4: Ch 5, dc in next ch-2 sp, *ch 2, (3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc) in next corner ch-3 sp**, [ch 2, 3 dc, in next ch-2 sp] twice; repeat from * 3 more times, ending last repeat at **, ch 2, 2 dc in last ch-2 sp; join with a sl st in 3rd ch of beginning ch-5.
Round 5: Ch 3, 2 dc in same ch-2 sp as joining, ch 2, 3 dc in next ch-2 sp, *ch 2, (3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc) in next corner ch-3 sp**, [ch 2, 3 dc in next ch-2 sp] 3 times; repeat from * 3 more times, ending last repeat at **, ch 2, 3 dc in last ch-2 sp, ch 2; join with sl st in 3rd ch of beginning ch-3.
Round 6: Ch 1, sc in same ch as joining, sc in each dc, 2 sc in each ch-2 sp, and 3 sc in each corner ch-3 sp around; join with a sl st in first sc. Tie off.
Weave in ends. Block if necessary.

Now that you’re schooled in squares, you’re ready for your first project–try my modern take on the granny pillow! The I Felt Square pattern is available for free on the Caron website. Get it here.

"I Felt Square" Pillows

Recommended References
http://vickiehowell.com/how-to-guides/
The Crochet Answer Book, by Edie Eckman
Lily Chinʼs Crochet Tips & Tricks
Crochet Today! Magazine
Interweave Crochet Magazine
YarnStandards.com
My Crochet Books
Pop Goes Crochet: 36 Projects Inspired by Icons of Popular Culture
AwareKnits: Knit & Crochet Projects for the Eco Conscious Stitcher (Hard Copy)
AwareKnits: Knit & Crochet Projects for the Eco Conscious Stitcher (Digital Version)

My Crochet Patterns on the Web

Stitch.Rock.Love,

 
 
 

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9 Responses

    Diane says:

    My daughter’s favorite blankie was one that my grandmother had crocheted for me when I was born. My daughter still loves it. It was a patchwork looking blanket with different sized blocks of color made from bits of different colored yarns. For some reason, my daughter teethed on the two bright yellow blocks and chewed them up. I’ve replaced one and need to do the other. She’s now 11 but reminds me occasionally to “fix her blankie.” :)

    Barb says:

    Almost every afghan I make anymore is just one giant granny square. I just keep going and making it bigger and bigger until its the size I want…i.e., baby blanket, full size bed, couch, or lap pad. I’ve backed them with fabric to make everything from pillows to purses to blankets (blanket on one side, quilting in the middle, afghan on the other side sandwiched together and sewn on the sewing machine.

    Arletta says:

    I have a ripple afghan made by my mother from that very same orange variegated yarn!

    Anonymous says:

    I so wish I could crochet AND that my dogs didn’t eat all my pillows! I love these… they’re so graphic!

    lori says:

    I LOVE GRANNYS IT WAS THE FIRST THING MY GRANMA SHOWED ME HOW TO MAKE 45 YEARS AGO.

    so cute! I have a huge granny square blanket I had made for a boyfriend of that time; now it’s mine. My Aunt Peg taught me how to create these squares.

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