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Let’s Take the World by Yarnstorm

July 16, 2010, 16:58 pm  Posted by needlearts
 
Photo mosaic from the Guerilla Knitting group on Flickr

(Click on the links below to find more work from each of these artists.)

1. hello, 2. Knitwit targets the IGA, 3. Knit graffiti – Itämeren Amsterdam 2, 4. Cat and Dog Raindrops Facing Davie St., 5. Knit graffiti – tykki, 6. “knit knot tree II” craftbombed, 7. Knit the City – Phonebox back, 8. duck’s gem, 9. WC, 10. very lovely snowfalkes, 11. Kauppahalli, 12. #43, 13. knit graffiti #3, 14. colour go round, 15. Crochet on Cuba

It’s a phenomenon with many names. Yarnstorming, yarnbombing, urban knitting, guerilla knitting, knit graffiti, knit tagging. Let me know the ones I’ve missed. Defenseless telephone poles and street signs wrapped in colorful cozies. Tiny, knitted creatures greeting you in the most unlikely public spaces. I think it’s fantastic. I love artful urban disruption and spectacle more than most things that aren’t people, and this really fits the bill. Shout out to Marilee Griffin for introducing me to yarnbombing through a comment on one of my earlier blog posts. With much fun and frivolity, knit graffiti groups are beautifying posts and parking meters around the world.

Smart Car by Magda Sayeg – Piece for II Lusso Essenziale, an arts festival in Rome that celebrates "the rediscovery of the extraordinary nature of everyday life"

Smart Car by Magda Sayeg – Piece for II Lusso Essenziale, an arts festival in Rome that celebrates "the rediscovery of the extraordinary nature of everyday life"

Guerilla knitter, Magda Sayeg, knits for the public, galleries, and friends alike and founded an awesome knit graffiti crew out in Austin, Texas. You can find her on her sleek website, on Twitter at knittaporfavor, and on her blog. The press section on her website is overflowing with mentions from major news outlets worldwide. Check out her gallery section, too. It’s fun to navigate with a map showing her work and community projects in several countries. From cars to crutches, she gleefully covers all objects great and small in her spunky knits. If you’re a graffiti knitter, be sure to submit photos of your work for her upcoming book documenting the extent of the yarnbombing movement.

Across the pond in London, the Knit the City Yarn Corps are “woolly warriors” fighting a “war on the mundane, humdrum and expected” with bright yarns and cheeky mischief. Inspired in their yarnstorming campaign by Magda’s crew, these spirited souls sport aliases, costumes, and delightful superhero back-stories with sass and style. Among these knit taggers are such dangerous characters as Deadly Knitshade, The Purple Purler, and Shorn-a the Dead. I love it so.

Thanks, CNN, for writing a story with lots of photos on urban knitters. Thanks to the BBC, too, for a nice video segment on yarnstorming and Knit the City. You can watch it below.

 
 
 
 

3 Responses

    Susan says:

    I love the BBC! Thanks for sharing this video.

    swing dancer says:

    I am visiting Berkeley, CA and there are pieces like this all over the place! They’re really rather lovely. The artist goes by the name of Streetcolor and the work is starting to move to various cities: http://streetcolor.wordpress.com

    Great post!

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